8 wellness tools for mental health

24 Jan 2020

When you’re struggling with your mental health, it can feel like an uphill battle trying to help yourself. We offer comprehensive mental health services which can put you back on the right track. We’ve also put together 8 wellness tools for mental health which can give you a boost, and even improve your mental health in the long run.

Meditation

Meditation has shown to be very effective when dealing with mental health issues. It can change the way your body deals with stress, therefore being an effective practice in the long run. Not only has meditation proven to be very helpful, but it’s free and can be carried out in the home. Click here to learn more about this practice’s benefits for mental health.

Getting help from mental health services

At Occupational Health Portsmouth, we are highly trained to help you with a range of mental health issues. The Wellness Recovery Action Plan® or WRAP® is an evidenced-based self-help tool designed to promote wellness. It is now used extensively by people in all kinds of circumstances, and by health care and mental health systems all over the world to address all kinds of physical, mental health and life issues. As well as WRAP®, we offer a range of mental health services, including stress management training and workplace wellbeing.

Journaling

During a bad mental health period, it may feel lonely and you may struggle to communicate with others. Keeping a journal and monitoring your feelings is an effective way to deal with things worrying you. Visualising problems can make them feel less daunting and help you find a resolution. Sharing your feelings is important and understandably you may feel unable to talk to others, so using a journal is a positive way to combat this.

Do something for a loved one or volunteer

If you are struggling and need something to lift you up, consider doing something kind for a loved one. Although it’s vital to work on yourself during a difficult time, focusing on someone else can give you some much-needed relief. Making a loved one happy is also a great mood booster and gives you a sense of purpose, something which can be lacking during a bad mental health period. Reaching out to other people can help build a support network that you can turn to. If you don’t have someone that you could help, you may find that volunteering for a charity will help to improve your mental health.

Recognise the importance of your mental health

Mental health is of vital importance and needs to be a main priority. Recognise which activities are having a positive or negative impact on you and how they make you feel. Don’t force yourself to carry out activities if your mental health is deteriorating. Rescheduling plans or taking a day off from work or study can you give you the opportunity to work on yourself and feel better. In today’s society pushing yourself to the limits can be seen as a positive thing, however, this can seriously impact your mental health. Recognise its importance and take steps to help yourself.

Exercise

If you are experiencing issues with your mental health, it can be understandably difficult to exercise, especially if you feel lethargic and excessively tired. Exercise can play a big part in improving mental health as it boosts endorphins, the hormone in your body which makes you feel happy. Additionally, doing something active can relieve stress, lessen anxiety and help you to sleep better. All these factors contribute to you feeling better mentally. You don’t need to run a marathon to exercise sufficiently. A brisk walk, gentle swim or even a dance around your living room can raise your heart rate and help you to feel some of the positive benefits. If you don’t want to do it alone, ask a friend to join you. You can engage in conversation and support each other, making it a more enjoyable experience. Click here to learn more about the benefits of exercise for your mental wellbeing.

Support groups

Understanding that you are not alone is crucial in your mental health journey. Speaking and relating to like-minded people can relieve the pressure and stress of the way you’re feeling. Support is a vital key in recovery and therefore a support group is a great step towards this. As well as local support groups there are forums and other online resources where you can connect with people experiencing the same issues. Sane.org have a range of resources including online including peer to peer support.

Discuss your mental health at your workplace

If you are struggling with your mental health at work, you should consider asking for a referral to Occupational Health or get in touch with your local IAPT department. This will help you to put steps in place for when you need extra help.

Local services IAPT include:

Portsmouth – Talking Change – https://www.talkingchange.nhs.uk/

Hampshire – italk – https://www.italk.org.uk/

Southampton –Steps to Wellbeing – https://www.steps2wellbeing.co.uk/

West Sussex – Time to Talk – https://www.sussexcommunity.nhs.uk/services/servicedetails.htm?DirectoryID=16358

 

References

SELF 2016, Here’s Why Meditation Is So Amazing For Your Mental Health, SELF, Accessed 11 December 2019, <https://www.self.com/story/heres-why-meditation-is-so-amazing-for-your-mental-health#>

Ackerman, C. MSc 2019, 83 Benefits of Journaling for Depression, Anxiety, and Stress, Positive Psychology, Accessed 11 December 2019 <https://positivepsychology.com/benefits-of-journaling/>

White, J. 2018, Can Charity Work Improve Your Mental Wellbeing?, Charity Job, Accessed 11 December 2019, <https://www.charityjob.co.uk/careeradvice/charity-work-and-mental-wellbeing/>

Holmes, R. 2018, Why employees need a mental health day, Westfield Health, Accessed 11 December 2019, <https://www.westfieldhealth.com/business/our-solutions/mental-health-first-aid>

Mental Health Foundation 2015, How to look after your mental health using exercise, Mental Health Foundation, Accessed 11 December 2019, <https://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/publications/how-to-using-exercise>

Robinson, L., Segal, J. Ph.D, Smith, M. M.A. 2019, The Mental Health Benefits of Exercise, Help Guide, Accessed 11 December 2019, <https://www.helpguide.org/articles/healthy-living/the-mental-health-benefits-of-exercise.htm>

Susman, D. PhD, 9 Benefits of Support Groups, David Susman, Accessed 11 December 2019, <http://davidsusman.com/2015/04/23/9-benefits-of-support-groups/>

 

 

Written by Kat Baker, Digital Marketing Assistant.

This blog was not written by a qualified mental health nurse. For more information please view the references or contact IAPT.